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EBacc continues to marginalise RE and the arts

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The English Baccalaureate is continuing to have an adverse effect on what schools teach, with new evidence showing that non-EBacc subjects are being hit harder than ever.

The English Baccalaureate is continuing to have an adverse effect on what schools teach, with new evidence showing that non-EBacc subjects are being hit harder than ever.

Subjects such as religious education and art and design are being squeezed off timetables as schools reorganise their curricula to accommodate the EBacc subjects.

Campaigners now fear the worst after education secretary Michael Gove unveiled the English Baccalaureate Certificate exam reforms last month, confirming that the EBacc subjects will remain the core focus for government.

It is estimated that nearly half of schools have changed their curricula to suit the EBacc. 

Subject organisations have expressed concern at the move, claiming that the emphasis on a narrow range of subjects will see an end of a balanced and broad curriculum for millions of children.

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