Post-16 performance measures to focus on progression from 2016

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The Department for Education (DfE) has confirmed its plans for new post-16 performance measures that aim to show students’ progress across their further education.

The Department for Education (DfE) has confirmed its plans for new post-16 performance measures that aim to show students’ progress across their further education.

The reforms will see new performance measures for colleges and school 6th forms that show students’ progress from GCSE to age 18 as compared to others with the same GCSE results. They will measure progress in both academic subjects and the new vocational Tech Levels.

The new-look post-16 performance measures, which will come into effect from 2016, will also include:

  • Students’ average grades.

  • The progress made by students who arrived without a C in English and/or maths.

  • The proportion of students who drop-out.

  • The proportion of students who go on to further study, a job or training at the end of their courses (although that DfE has said that destination information will only be published “when the data is robust enough”).

It comes as the secondary school accountability system prepares to move to the Progress 8 measure, which will detail progress between key stage 2 and GCSE across eight subjects (for details, see pages 8 and 9). A threshold A* to C measure for English and maths GCSE is also to be retained alongside the English Baccalaureate.

At the same time, primary school tables are changing too and will show pupils’ progress from age 4 to 11 compared to others with similar starting points in reception class.

There are to be new tests in year 6 for maths, reading, grammar, punctuation and spelling with schools expected to get 

85 per cent of pupils to attain a new standard that is to be higher than the current Level 4 target.

All schools and colleges will also have to publish for parents an “at-a-glance overview of the progress a school’s pupils make, and the grades they achieve”, the DfE added.

Schools minister David Laws said: “The new system will mean higher standards, no hiding place for underperforming schools and coasting schools, and real credit being given to schools and colleges which may have challenging intakes but which improve their pupils’ performance.

“Colleges and school 6th forms will, for the first time, have to meet a range of demanding measures and show that they are getting their students into good jobs, further study or Apprenticeships.”

Speaking about the new post-16 plans, Brian Lightman, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said: “New measures that are consistent and similar across different types of provider will give students and parents a much better basis for making an informed choice, and can help us move towards a level playing field for inspection and holding institutions to account.

“ASCL values the opportunity to offer views about the development of accountability measures, for 2016 and beyond.”

Details on the post-16 changes are available online at www.gov.uk/government/consultations/16-to-19-accountability-consultation


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