Petition calls for mandatory dyslexia training

Published:

Two major dyslexia charities are calling for all new teachers to receive mandatory training about the condition.

Two major dyslexia charities are calling for all new teachers to receive mandatory training about the condition.

A hard-hitting video campaign has been launched by the British Dyslexia Association (BDA) showing the impact that the condition can have on a student’s education.

The BDA says that dyslexia affects around 10 per cent of all school pupils, and a significantly higher proportion of excluded pupils. Alongside the video campaign, it is aiming to get 100,000 signatures on a government e-petition and thus spark a Parliamentary debate on the issue.

The e-petition, which currently has around 14,500 names, states: “The BDA proposes that initial teacher training course providers should be required to deliver mandatory and consistent dyslexia awareness sessions. 

“All teachers should be trained to understand dyslexia, its impact on learning and what constitutes dyslexia-friendly practice. Teachers should be aware of when to signpost learners for assessment and when to provide appropriate intervention.”

Meanwhile, a study by Dyslexia Action this week found that 89 per cent of parents of dyslexic children think that teachers should have specialist training. The findings are contained in a report by the charity – Dyslexia Still Matters – which claims that knowledge, understanding and expertise about the condition in our schools is still “patchy”.

The report calls for a compulsory module on SENs including dyslexia as part of initial teacher training and calls for a UK dyslexia and literacy strategy to be created.

Dr Kate Saunders, CEO of the BDA, said: “It is astonishing that in the 21st century, so many schools are unable to offer dyslexic pupils the level of support necessary.”

Sign the e-petition at http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/20674 and watch theBDA video on YouTube.

For the Dyslexia Still Matters report, visit www.dyslexiaaction.org.uk.


Comments
Name
 
Email
 
Comments
 

Please view our Terms and Conditions before leaving a comment.

Change the CAPTCHA codeSpeak the CAPTCHA code
 
Claim Free Subscription