Half of teachers have considered quitting the profession in the past year

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More than two-thirds of teachers have considered leaving their jobs in the past year, with more than half thinking about quitting teaching altogether.

More than two-thirds of teachers have considered leaving their jobs in the past year, with more than half thinking about quitting teaching altogether.

The NASUWT has published the findings of its annual Big Question study involving more than 14,000 of its members.

The 2013 survey found that 53 per cent of the teachers say their job satisfaction has fallen in the past year, up six per cent since 2011 when the Big Question research first took place.

Furthermore, 65 per cent have considered leaving their jobs in the last year, up three per cent since 2011, and 54 per cent have considered quitting the profession – up nine per cent.

The survey, which was carried out during March and April, found that teachers’ top four concerns are:

  • Workload (cited by 78 per cent).

  • Changes to pensions (51 per cent).

  • Pay (45 per cent).

  • School inspection (41 per cent).

Respondents also expressed concerns about the forthcoming move to performance-related pay, with 86 per cent saying that they do not have confidence in their governing bodies to make “balanced decisions on pay”.

Elsewhere, 46 per cent of the teachers said they were finding it difficult to meet the increased cost of their pension, while 38 per cent said that their school buildings were not fit for pupils. Seventy-six per cent of teachers said they have experienced more workplace stress in the last 12 months.

Ninety-eight per cent of the 14,000 teachers said that they do not believe that the coalition government’s policies will help education.

Chris Keates, general secretary of the NASUWT, said: “Three years of relentless attacks on teachers by the coalition government have resulted in a profession in crisis.

“Teachers’ pay and working conditions are inextricably linked to the provision of high-quality education for all children and young people. Yet the secretary of state arrogantly and recklessly continues to cut pay, plunder pensions and hack to pieces national salary scales.

“Not content with this, he is now laying plans to remove other key contractual provisions, particularly those which support and enable teachers to work effectively. 

“No-one, therefore, should be surprised that over half of teachers are considering leaving teaching altogether and that applications for teacher training are down and resignations are up. Teachers are understandably angry, frustrated and demoralised.”


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