Remembrance Day 2021

Written by: Pete Henshaw | Published:

Free teaching resources have been published to help children understand the importance of Remembrance and its relevance to us today.

Created by the National Literacy Trust and the Royal British Legion, the resources cater for key stages 1 to 5 and include assemblies, whole-school projects, and book club resources – for use at school or at home.

The resources tackle how Britain’s national Remembrance traditions have evolved, discuss different community and national commemorations, and encourage pupils to imagine what Remembrance might look like for them in the future.

They include a look at how the poppy has become an enduring symbol of support and remembrance. There is also support for schools to help them observe the two-minute silence on November 11.

Available in English and Welsh, the resources are linked to the national curriculum, focus on core reading skills and are differentiated for students depending on age, interests, and ability. They include:

Key stages 1 to 5 Remembrance Assemblies: The assemblies explore 100 years of Remembrance through videos of veterans and civilians. After the success of the key stage 1 to 4 assemblies in previous years, the resources have also been adapted for students aged 16 to 18-years-old, focusing on who, how and why we remember.

Key stage 3 Remembrance Book Clubs: Texts available explore topics including the experiences of Jewish children in the Second World War, the contribution of African and West Indian people to the war effort and rebuilding of Britain, and the impact of serving in Afghanistan on two brothers. A teacher guide and activity sheets for each extract are also included, featuring discussion questions and glossaries. The book club is based on extracts from a range of authors including Terry Pratchett, Lucy Strange, David Olusoga, Liz Kessler, Tony Bradman, Phil Earle and Elizabeth Wein.

Primary Whole-School Project: The RBL’s new Sounds of Remembrance project for primary schools sees children work towards creating an audio time capsule which records the ways people in their community take part in Remembrance. Through a series of sessions children can learn how our national Remembrance traditions have evolved, discuss different community and national Remembrance traditions, and imagine what Remembrance might look like for them in the future.


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