One per cent pay rise disappointing but ‘realistic’

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Teachers and school leaders have welcomed the decision to award a one per cent pay increase across the board as the best that they could have expected.

Teachers and school leaders have welcomed the decision to award a one per cent pay increase across the board as the best that they could have expected.

In a ministerial statement, education secretary Michael Gove said he will accept, in full, recommendations from the School Teachers’ Review Body (STRB) that pay rates should be increased by one per cent from September 2013. The decision is subject to a four-week consultation.

The STRB’s proposed rise applies to all elements of pay on the teaching and leadership pay scales, as well as for individual allowances.

Public sector pay has been frozen for two years, except for those earning £21,000 or less, and the government has now set out a policy of a one per cent average rise.

The rise this September will be the last time that teachers receive wage increases based on length of service, as the move to performance-related pay will come into effect in September 2014.

The STRB said its decision to award a rise to all teachers was influenced by “the need to provide some underpinning support for the teacher labour market as a whole, at a time when there are early signs that the position of teachers is deteriorating in relation to other graduate professions.”

Deborah Lawson, general secretary of Voice, said that while the increase was “disappointing” it was what was “realistically expected”.

She added: “It is better than nothing but does not recognise the dedication and hard work of teachers in managing the enormous upheavals that they are experiencing.”

Mr Gove had proposed to apply the award only to the minima and maxima of the pay scales and to give headteachers discretion on the remaining pay points – but the STRB rejected this idea.

Brian Lightman, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, added: “Teachers have seen their salaries reduced in real terms over the last few years so this is welcome news. Is it right that the pay award should be applied across the board. There is no case for differential treatment for teachers at different levels or with different responsibilities.”


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