Effective classroom questioning strategies

Written by: Andy McHugh | Published:
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Thanks Archie. I always think that getting the fundamentals consistently right is the best way to ...

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Do you ask the right questions during your lessons? In the right order? Teacher Andy McHugh discusses effective questioning in the secondary school classroom and offers some useful strategies

Earlier in my career, I used to ask all of the wrong questions and when I asked the right ones, I asked them in the wrong order.

The result was predictably bleak. My students still learned, but at times it took far longer than it should have done and, in some cases, very little learning happened at all.

This was down to me (most of the time).

I am sure that most of us have felt guilty for letting our students down when we have taught a lesson that just didn’t do what we wanted it to do. But rather than spend time navel-gazing, it is important that we instead address one of the most fundamental parts of our teaching.

No, not the worksheets, or the PowerPoints, or even the homework. It’s our questioning.

It is too easy to think that we have got our craft down to an art. But is questioning more of a science?

In my own experience, asking the right questions at the right time, to the right people, in the right way, is often what transforms a lesson from mediocre to truly excellent.

Not only that, but there is a way to do it well and with consistency, without your students tiring of formulaic lessons.

What’s the purpose of asking questions?

There are many reasons why we ask questions in class, whether it is to check the level of understanding, stretch answers further, or to help develop confidence in our quieter students. A key component to effective questioning, though, is identifying why you are asking the question in the first place.

This is where “planning for questions” comes in. When I plan a topic, I always begin by deciding what my students need to know by the end and what skills I want them to be able to demonstrate. Only then can I decide which questions are more important than others.

For example, in religious studies, I teach the nature of religious experience and how far it proves the existence of an afterlife. In order to teach this, I need students to be able to answer questions such as:

  • What defines a religious experience?
  • What are the different types of religious experience?
  • What common features do different types of religious experiences have?
  • How do religious experiences manifest themselves in different religions and cultures?
  • Why do people believe that religious experiences are convincing as evidence for an afterlife?
  • Why do people believe that religious experiences are not convincing as evidence for an afterlife?
  • How convincing is religious experience as an explanation for an afterlife?
  • How far does a belief in religious experiences impact the lives of believers?

Each question is designed to build upon the knowledge and skills that were learnt and developed in response to the previous question. By the end, I can be much more certain that students have an excellent understanding of the topic. Moreover, if a student was unable to answer a specific question, I’d easily be able to identify the reason why, just by working through the previous questions to see where they began to struggle.

Higher order vs lower order questions?

In the past, it was argued by some that higher order questions, which require students to analyse and evaluate, were more important than lower order questions, which simply sought to develop a basic understanding. This is wrong.

Without first establishing a basic level of understanding of the main points, it is pointless to ask the higher order questions. After all, you can’t evaluate the persuasiveness of religious experience, without first knowing the key features, which you then need to critically analyse.

All students need to master those basics, regardless of their prior attainment or levels of ability, before they move on to more complex analysis and evaluation.

Knowledge comes first: you can’t apply skills in a vacuum.

That being said, higher order questions can make a huge difference to students who would otherwise give simplistic and short answers. The question “Was the Treaty of Versailles significant in causing the Second World War?” elicits a much simpler response than “How significant was the Treaty of Versailles in causing the Second World War?”

Students who would give a brief yes/no response to the first question would have to justify and evaluate their reasoning in answer to the second question.

What difference does effective questioning make?

Effective questioning, if viewed as part of an effective feedback dialogue between the teacher and the students, can lead to an additional eight months of progress being made across a year according to the Education Endowment Foundation’s Teaching and Learning Toolkit research (see further information).

In my own experience as a classroom teacher, effective questioning makes a huge difference. Not only to the quality of teaching and learning, but it also cuts out activities that don’t contribute to the true purpose of the lesson or topic. Consequently, effective questioning reduces unnecessary workload – the Holy Grail in teaching today.

How should the questions be asked?

When asking questions, it is important that you give your students time to think before answering. One way to do this is to give them some key questions in advance, either on the board or on a worksheet.

Whether you do this or not, you should always wait for an answer, even if it means creating an uncomfortable silence for a few extra seconds.

We can often be guilty of jumping in too soon if a student doesn’t answer. However, this can be detrimental as it allows students to effectively opt-out of answering if they know you will quickly do it for them.

Instead, if you really have to, try rephrasing the question or asking something specific about part of the answer you want them to give. By narrowing your question in this way, a confused student might be able to give a more confident answer. From there, you can then ask a follow-up question that builds on what they have already said.

The follow-up question could also be asked to a different student, to keep the rest of the class on their toes. The popular strategy of “pose, pause, pounce, bounce” is a really simple and powerful questioning tool, which you and your students will find increasingly effective the more often you use it.

First, pose the question to the class, then pause, allowing the class to think of their response. After this you “pounce” and ask a specific student for their answer. You can then “bounce” to another student to answer a follow-up question.

What about those students who still don’t answer?

Some students just don’t want to answer questions in front of their peers. More often than not it is a confidence issue and it is easy to just let these students live an easy life.

However, for these students to thrive over the long-term, it is vital that you keep asking them questions, rather than leaving them out. Ask them simple questions to get them used to speaking in front of others.

The lower the stakes, the more they will feel they can answer without the crippling fear of getting it wrong in front of others. Over time (this could be weeks or even months), gradually ask them more challenging questions as their confidence grows.

How much time should you spend on questioning in your lessons?

As much time as possible! I have found over the years that students perform much better when they have spent a significant amount of time answering and debating the answers to questions during your lessons.

Having a range of different answers helps them to develop their own understanding, particularly of complex topics, and gives them models to base their own answers on.

It is also an incredible way to build engagement in the lesson, as students feel as though they have some ownership over the direction of the lesson and are able to “try out” their answers before committing them to paper in high-stakes assessments where it “really counts”.

Effective questioning strategies are the lifeblood of many of the most engaging and thought-provoking lessons I have taught and observed. If I focus on nothing else but this, my students will receive an enriching curriculum that stimulates and challenges them. Oh, and they will also be well prepared for the rigour of their exams (after all, that’s quite important too).

So, any questions? I hope so!

Further information

Teaching and Learning Toolkit: Feedback (Education Endowment Foundation): http://bit.ly/2J4XCTP


Comments
Thanks Archie. I always think that getting the fundamentals consistently right is the best way to ensure high-quality teaching. Rosenshine's Principles of Instruction are an excellent research-based summary.
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One of the strengths of the article is the fact that it highlights a crucial aspect of quality learning that is too often taken for granted by teachers. Aspects of the article would make for a good mini-workshop of around 45 minutes with a mix of teachers, experienced and inexperienced.
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